• Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Instagram

Fine Art Photography by Yoav Cohen

+ Behind the Image

National Geographic Finalist 


The name Ruhama can be translated as mercy, רחמים, and the name of Kibbutz Ruhama is derived from the biblical verse

"And I will have mercy upon her that had not obtained mercy" 

(Hosea 2:23)"


In winter it is often refered to as the 'Tuscany of Israel', with its rolling hills and epic sunrises. Traveling south during summer, the Ruhama Badlands are usually not on the must see map of photographers. 


On this summer's morning, something within me drew me to drive through the fields of Ruhama's Kibbutz, and to stop alongside a field that had just been harvested. From above, the field appeared to be an abstract painting of a troubled artist - the right brain vs. the left brain. Straight  vs free form. 


And in the middle - the harvested hay collected in a bale and ready to be hauled off. 


Who knew that tractors could make such beautiful art. 

+ Availability

Limited edition, series of 10 original artist proof prints.

For more information and a personalized quote, please inquire below.

Prints can be ordered in a variety of sizes, formats and framing options. To receive a personalized consultation and quote, including printing and shipping costs, please enter your details below.

Thanks. We will be in touch.

Purchase

Ruhama Badlands 1

Negev Desert

© 2022 by Yoav Cohen. Created on Editor X.

Accessibility Statement: This website has been created with the intent of making it accessible for all visitors, including those who use assistive technologies. If you find an issue with the website, please email and report the issue, and it will be addressed as soon as possible.

This website and its contents are the sole property of the photographer. No content may be used without purchasing or receiving written consent from the owner. Violations will be pursued to the furthest extent allowed under the law.

Connect 

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Instagram

Thanks for subscribing!

Subscribe

Ancient Land. New Perspectives